5 Ted talks to share with your children

5 Ted talks to share with your children

We all need motivation from time to time, children even more so. But the thing with children especially teenagers is that they don’t want to be preached.

If you are a parent who wants to inspire and ignite the growth mindset of your child then you must share these Ted talks with your child.

Don’t force them to watch it. Just simply share the link or put it up on TV when everyone is sitting together.

Ted talks is an excellent free learning resource and encouraging your children to watch other people’s struggles and achievements is a great way to inspire them to reach their goals or overcome their obstacles.

Grit: the power of passion and perseverance – Angela Lee Duckworth

Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn’t the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of “grit” as a predictor of success.

https://youtu.be/H14bBuluwB8

Tap on the youtube link to watch this beautifully inspiring video by @angelaleeduckworth

What adults can learn from kids by Adora Svitak

A voracious reader from age three, Adora Svitak’s first serious foray into writing — at age five — was limited only by her handwriting and spelling. (Her astonishing verbal abilities already matched that of young adults over twice her age.) As her official bio says, her breakthrough would soon come “in the form of a used Dell laptop her mother bought her.” At age seven, she typed out over 250,000 words — poetry, short stories, observations about the world — in a single year.

Svitak has since fashioned her beyond-her-years wordsmithing into an inspiring campaign for literacy — speaking across the country to both adults and kids. She is author of Flying Fingers, a book on learning.

https://youtu.be/V-bjOJzB7LY

Click on the Youtube link to watch the video.

Yup, I built a nuclear fusion reactor by Taylor Wilson

Taylor Wilson believes nuclear fusion is a solution to our future energy needs, and that kids can change the world. And he knows something about both of those: When he was 14, he built a working fusion reactor in his parents’ garage. Now 17, he takes the TED stage at short notice to tell (the short version of) his story.

https://youtu.be/9B0PaSznWJE

Click on the Youtube link to watch the video.

An 11-year-old’s magical violin by Sirena Huang

Violinist Sirena Huang gives a technically brilliant and emotionally nuanced performance. In a charming interlude, the 11-year-old praises the timeless design of her instrument.

Only 11 years old when she performed at TED, Sirena Huang is still technically a child. But as anyone who sees her perform can attest, she has a musician’s soul that transcends her years. “Her musical imagination is boundless,” said Juilliard dean Stephen Clapp, who described her as “a musical artist with qualities of maturity far beyond her age.” 

What’s most striking in her performance style is the way she combines technical ability with emotional force and nuance. Her fiercely virtuoso performances are profoundly moving, even via podcast. “Amazed,” “delighted” and “spellbound” are the words bloggers often use after watching her play. She has won numerous awards for her brilliant performances worldwide, and has played for the likes of French president Nicolas Sarkozy, King Abdullah II of Jordan, and the Dalai Lama.

https://youtu.be/-yOXsK5-SFY

Click on the link to watch the video

Science is for everyone, kids included by Beau Lotto and Amy O’Toole

What do science and play have in common? Neuroscientist Beau Lotto thinks all people (kids included) should participate in science and, through the process of discovery, change perceptions. He’s seconded by 12-year-old Amy O’Toole, who, along with 25 of her classmates, published the first peer-reviewed article by schoolchildren, about the Blackawton bees project. It starts: “Once upon a time … “

Beau Lotto seeks to pull aside the curtain of why we see what we do in order to create the possibility and agency in deciding what to perceive next.

Amy O’Toole is a 12-year-old student with a peer-reviewed scientific publication under her belt. She took part in a participative science program led by Beau Lotto , called “i, scientist,” which inspired a science experiment by a group of 26 primary school students in Blackawton, Devon, UK. O’Toole was never interested in science before this project, but now intends to study the human mind and body.

https://youtu.be/0g2WE1qXiKM

Click on the link to watch the video.

Learning is limitless and ways of learning are endless.

Hope your children learn from these child prodigies and get inspired in some way!

Source : ted.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s